2010-02-02

Setsubun and Mamemaki

February 3rd is 'Setsubun' in japan.
we usually throw soybeans called Mamemaki on the day for ceremony to drive away evil spirits.
Somehow Japnese evil images are like this..:D
very scarely dont they?How about you?


Mamemaki is usually performed by the toshiotoko of the household (i.e., the male who was born on the corresponding animal year on the Chinese zodiac), or else the male head of the household.

Roasted soybeans (called Fuku mame) are thrown either out the door or at a member of the family wearing an Oni (demon or ogre) mask, while the throwers chant "Oni wa soto! Fuku wa uchi!" The words roughly translate to "Demons out! Luck in!"

It shows 'Fukumame' in Kanji. I bought this one at the supermarket yesterday:)

 The beans are thought to symbolically purify the home by driving away the evil spirits that bring misfortune and bad health with them. Then, as part of bringing luck in, it is customary to eat roasted soybeans, one for each year of one's life, and in some areas, one for each year of one's life plus one more for bringing good luck for the year to come.


People used to decorate the head of sardine with holly at the entrances as a ward off evil.  Nowdays we dont see that display

Mamemaki in kyoto Gion with Maiko-san

16 件のコメント:

Michela さんのコメント...

How interesting! Thank you for sharing!
Hope you're having a good week!

Juanita Tortilla さんのコメント...

Very interesting!
I wouldn't mind eating one more extra soy bean, hehe. And I don't think I have ever tasted roasted soy beans?

zsazsazsu さんのコメント...

Very nice to read this. Are these soybeans good ? Do they taste good ?

Floss さんのコメント...

This is interesting - it's at the same time as Candlemas and maybe it has some of the same ideas? What do you think? The end of the winter, and inviting in the good and the light. Thank you so much for this fascinating post!

TK さんのコメント...

It's very interesting to learn more about Japanese culture.I've never tried roasted soy beans but I love soy bean drink and soy bean curd..Soy bean is everyone's favourite here..

Dragonfly さんのコメント...

Thanks!! Have a great week :-)

joo さんのコメント...

It's such an interesting post! The decoration of sardine's head is a bit strange:)
I must try roast soya beans, by the way.
Greetings:)

Tracey さんのコメント...

Dear Mami..... I replied to your email the same day!!!?????? I will try again....xxxxx

The Pink Birdhouse さんのコメント...

Mami, that is a trully interesting post about one of your customs there in Japan! I was fascinated! It reminds me very much of the german custom of "Karneval", where everyone dresses up in bright colorful costumes in February, visits parades, make lots of noise and have parties. It is to drive away all the demons and bad spirits of the winter and allow the spring time to come unharmed! In a way, similar to your custom. I like the throwing of the soybeans!! Here they throw candy.

thank you for always visiting my posts. It makes me smile to see your name there. hugs from afar, Debby

Viki さんのコメント...

Very, very interesting. Thanks for sharing.

Jenny さんのコメント...

I don't like scary either. Are the soybeans crunchy? Have you ever had corn nuts? That is what I picture them like and that sounds delicious! Thank you for taking part in Alphabe-Thursday!

RNSANE さんのコメント...

Beautiful pictures and an interesting tradition. I have been so fortunate to visit Japan twice in recent years, for a very short week each trip - what a beautiful country with so much history and culture. I especially loved Kyoto and Akita.

laterg8r さんのコメント...

cool post - love to learn new things like this :D

Tracey さんのコメント...

Hi Mami.....You asked what a charity shop was... People donate unwanted goods such as clothing, china, books,household things....all sorts really! To a charity shop, who then sells the things on at a very cheap price, and the money received, goes to good causes, I prefer cancer charities, heart & kidney also Oxfam or the red cross. So it's good to donate stuff also to buy stuff! I hope this is clear!
xxxxxxxx

Janie さんのコメント...

The big red evil spirit man looks scary! This is an interesting tradition.

Sid Brechin さんのコメント...

I have never been to Japan yet. I can carry on maybe a 15 minute conversation and read a little. I find the history fascinating. One thing I found interesting is that while many Warriors masks were indeed demons there were also many made to look like squirrels cats and other cuddly animals. ( went to a display at the Japan Instute in Toronto ).

I have an illness which prevents travel however as soon as I recover enough I intend to visit Japan.